Monthly Archives: December 2017

Episode 15: Our Mediocre Media



Fox News’s Chris Stirewalt joins Jonah for the latest Remnant to discuss the decrepit state of our media and politics. Also, Jonah and co wrap up the show with a highly self-indulgent year in review.

New podcast music by Rob Alley.

Show Notes:


Episode 14: Arthur Brooks’s The Meaning of Life



Jonah climbs high into the (metaphorical) Himalayas in this week’s Remnant, in search of advice from Arthur Brooks, the guru-like president of the American Enterprise Institute. They meditate upon various topics, including but not limited to finding meaning in life, what’s next for American politics, and what’s so special about the French horn.

New podcast music is “Game Theme” by Remnant listener Steven M. Alper.

Show Notes:


Episode 13: Podcast Potpourri



Jonah goes guest-free in this week’s Remnant, allowing him to engage in some rank punditry about Roy Moore’s defeat in Alabama and answer listener questions. The show runs the gamut from veganism, best conservative books, and best Twitter accounts, to trade deficits, Al Gore’s inhuman presence, advice for motivating bright but lazy teenage boys, and more. We close with a live reading of something that arguably outdoes sasquatch romance. New podcast music by Roy Lee Nelson.

Show Notes:


Episode 12: Episode Behind Enemy Lines



In the latest Remnant, Jonah talks with Steve Hayward, currently a visiting professor at University of California, Berkeley — and a conservative. They discuss how what conservatives can do to make more inroads into higher education, and why elite schools should welcome the effort. Other topics include Who was Leo Strauss? Are the East Coast-West Coast Staussian wars over? Is Donald Trump a statesman? And other pressing questions.

Show Notes:


Episode 11: Afraid of Trade?



As The Remnant enters double digits, Jonah journeys into the international marketplace, with Cato Institute trade scholar and trade lawyer Scott Lincicome as his guide. Jonah and Scott defend free trade, and try to answer its critics.

Show Notes: